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Saturday, January 19, 2013

THE MOST AMAZING SCIENCE IMAGES OF THE WEEK XVII


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A Landscape Tweeted From Space And Other Amazing Photos From This Week
By Colin Lecher and Shaunacy Ferro,
Popular Science, 18 January 2013.

Including moth wings in macro, a hidden leopard and more…

1. A Tweet From Space

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Astronaut Chris Hadfield tweeted this photo, of the Richat Structure of Mauritania, from space. And he's right when he tweeted it's "[u]ndoubtedly one of the coolest space sights on Earth."

2. Deep Freeze

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Credit: Gary Jensen via It's Nice That

Photographer Gary Jensen was commissioned to document the final days of a Chicago cold storage company. The results, a rare look inside, are less corporate commercial and more arctic adventure. [More at It's Nice That]

3. Robot-Created Art

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Credit: Mattias Jones via Co.Design

Not only was this room decorated by a dedicated robot, but that line tracing around goes completely unbroken. Still, the masterpiece couldn't have been made without programmer/designer Mattias Jones, who set the robot up to make its masterpiece. [More at Co.Design]

4. Robo-Waiter

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Credit: Sheng Li/Reuters via American Photo

And speaking of the coming robot uprising, this is a "robot restaurant" in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China. A staff of 20 'bots cook and deliver food. Read more and check out some other great photojournalism from this week over at American Photo.

5. Beijing From Space

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Beijing is going through an especially bad bout of poor air quality. This photo, from NASA’s Terra satellite, might give you an idea of just how bad. [More at NASA Earth Observatory]

6. The Brazilian Treehopper

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Credit: Alfred Keller via io9

Meet the adorable Brazilian Treehopper. Yes, it's real. Yes, it's weird. Yes, it really has those things at the top of its head. Read about it over at io9.

7. A Volcano Going Up

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Credit: David Jon Ogmundsson via Flavorwire

David Jon Ogmundsson takes eye-popping shots of nature, and this one, part of a series documenting the eruptions of Mt. Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland, is him at his best. [More at Flavorwire]

8. NASA's New Mask

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Credit: NASA

The Portable Unit for Metabolic Analysis, or PUMA, is a NASA-designed mask that'll monitor astronauts' oxygen intake and carbon dioxide output during exercise. It sure looks like the future. [More at NASA]

9. Martian River

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Credit: ESA

A topographic view of Reull Vallis on Mars. According to the European Space Agency, it is believed to have been formed by water that flowed during the Hesperian period, which ended 1.8-3.5 billion years ago. The channel is nearly 7 km wide and almost 300 km deep. [More at ESA]

10. Construction With Clothes

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Credit: Julien Gouiric via Design Boom

"Construction With Clothes" by dantiope was featured in "Performance Architecture," an international ideas exhibition in Guimaraes, Portugal in 2012. The competition uses performance art to reimagine the role of architects, artists and designers. [More at Design Boom]

11. Macro Moth

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Credit: Linden Gledhill via io9

Photographer and biochemist Linden Gledhill takes macro images of moth and butterfly wings to study their structure. These are the scales of a moth's wing. You can check out his whole collection here.

12. Where's The Leopard?

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A leopard shows off the art of camouflage.

Top image: Volcanic eruption of Iceland’s Mt. Eyjafjallaj√∂kull. Photo credit: David Jon Ogmundsson via Flavorwire.

[Source: Popular Science. Edited. Top image added.]


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