Sunday, 6 November 2016


From law enforcement to criminals, governments to insurgents, and activists to Facebook dabblers, many people have come to rely on encryption to protect their digital information and keep their communications secure. But the current forms of encryption could be obsolete the moment anyone succeeds in building a quantum computer. A what?! Read on about the brave new world awaiting us in the following infographic by Who Is Hosting This.

Infographic Sources:
1. Your Encryption Will Be Useless Against Hackers With Quantum Computers
2. What Are Supercomputers Used For?
3. What Makes a Supercomputer?
4. Quantum Computing
5. Qubit
6. A Tale of Two Qubits How Quantum Computers Work
7. Bits and Bytes
8. Intro to Binary Numbers
9. How Does a Quantum Computer Work?
10. The Phosphorous Atom Quantum Computing Machine
11. Quantum Computing 101
12. Prime Factorization
13. RSA Algorithm
14. Diffie-Hellman Protocol
15. Public Key Cryptography
16. Why Is Factoring Numbers Into Primes a Difficult Problem
17. What Is the Life Cycle of the Sun
18. NSA Seeks to Build Quantum Computer That Could Crack Most Types of Encryption
19. The Clock Is Ticking for Encryption
20. Confused About the NSA’s Quantum Computing Project? This MIT Computer Scientist Can Explain
21. D-Wave
22. Your Encryption Will Be Useless Against Hackers With Quantum Computers
23. Superconducting Qubit Array Points Way Quantum Computers
24. The Man Who Will Build Google’s Elusive Quantum Computer
25. Evidence for Quantum Annealing With More Than One Hundred Qubits
26. Google Launches Effort to Build Its Own Quantum Computer
27. Australian Researchers Have Created the Most Accurate Quantum Computing Technology
28. ID Quantique
29. The Case for Quantum Key Distribution (PDF)

[Source: Who Is Hosting This.]

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