Friday, 10 June 2016


Is Your Home Safe From Hackers? (Researchers Say, “Probably Not”)
By KeriLynn Engel,
Who Is Hosting This, 8 June 2016.

Hackers were never so powerful as they were in the 1990s movies. By furiously typing on their keyboards, they could decode any encryption, steal any amount of money from any person or organization, reveal any classified government secret…even travel back in time.

In the early days of the internet, hacking powers were sorely misunderstood. Internet technology made it seem like anything was possible. The general public didn’t understand the limitations of the new technology yet.

Today, the average person is a bit more tech-savvy. We know you can’t really make things explode at will with hacking, bring down the Hoover Dam with a bit of code, or battle other hackers with two people at one keyboard.

But maybe these over-the-top examples have made us a little too skeptical about the possibilities of hacking.

We’ll probably never be able to achieve time travel through hacking, but there are plenty of vulnerable systems in the present. Hackers may be more dangerous than you think.

It’s true, most hackers can be defeated by plain common sense. Using strong, unique passwords and using up-to-date software will thwart many of them.

But it’s not just your computer or smartphone that’s at risk.

Have you ever thought about having to protect your baby monitor from hackers? Hacking a baby monitor is easier than you might think, especially with modern versions that connect to WiFi and come with a smartphone app.

Ever get the feeling you’re being watched, even when you know you’re alone in the room? You very well could be under surveillance if a hacker gains access to your webcam without your knowledge.

Even hacking traffic lights isn’t quite as far-fetched as you might think.

As the Internet of Things expands and more devices are becoming “smart,” it’s more important than ever to make sure they’re secure, or your personal safety could be at risk.

Check out the graphic below for more examples of how hackers can control the world around us, and not just in the movies.

Is Your Home Safe From Hackers? (Researchers Say, 'Probably Not')

Infographic Sources:
How Easy Is It For Someone To Hack Your Webcam?
2. Your Computer and Phone Cameras Are On - Beware!
3. Russian website posting live video streams from hacked webcams
4. Lower Merion School District Settles Webcam Spying Lawsuits For $610,000
5. FTC and TrendNet settle claim over hacked security cameras
6. FTC settles with Trendnet after “hundreds” of home security cameras were hacked
7. Bug Exposes IP Cameras, Baby Monitors
8. Spies Can Track You Just by Watching Your Phone’s Power Use
9. Online Privacy: 10 Surprisingly Terrifying Ways Your Online Life Can Be Tracked
10. iPhones can be hacked while charging
11. Samsung Galaxy phone hack: SwiftKey vulnerability lets hackers easily take control of devices
12. The Gyroscopes in Your Phone Could Let Apps Eavesdrop on Conversations
13. Hacker Demos Android App That Can Wirelessly Steal And Use Credit Cards’ Data
14. PlaceRaider: The Military Smartphone Malware Designed to Steal Your Life
15. Information Regarding the Keyboard Security Issue and Our Device Policy Update
16. Vulnerability could put up to 600 million Samsung smartphones at risk
17. Samsung announces fix for Galaxy keyboard vulnerability
18. BMW Update Kills Bug In 2.2 Million Cars That Left Doors Wide Open To Hackers
19. Cars hacked through wireless tire sensors
20. Hacker Disables More Than 100 Cars Remotely
21. Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway - With Me in It
22. After Jeep Hack, Chrysler Recalls 1.4M Vehicles for Bug Fix
23. Internet of Things (IoT)
24. Internet of things research study
25. When refrigerators, TVs, and cars attack: Hacking the Internet of Things
26. When “Smart Homes” Get Hacked: I Haunted A Complete Stranger’s House Via The Internet

[Post Source: Who Is Hosting This.]

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